Asyndeton - Definition and Examples of Asyndeton

 

asyndeton examples in literature

Examples of Asyndeton in Literature "Are all thy conquests, glories, triumphs, spoils, shrunk to this little measure?" Shakespeare, Julius Caesar "These griefs, these woes, these sorrows make me old." Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet "That was the inexhaustible charm that rose and fell in it, the jingle of it, the cymbals' song of it.". The Opposite of Polysyndeton: Asyndeton. Polysyndeton has an opposite, called asyndeton (something Joe is very fond of using). Asyndeton is what would result if you replaced all the conjunctions in the sample sentence above with commas, as in the famous Julius Caesar quote, “Veni, vidi, vici.”. Examples of Asyndeton in Literature. Because asyndeton is a common habit of everyday speech, writers often use it to create realistic dialects for their characters. It can also be used to exhaust an idea or feeling with a long, extensive list.


Polysyndeton: Definition and Examples | asojtinsa.gq


Polysyndeton is a stylistic device in which several coordinating conjunctions are used in succession in order to achieve an artistic effect. Polysyndeton examples are found in literature and in day-to-day conversations.

Thomas S. Kane describes the difference between the two devices, saying that they are nothing more than the techniques of handling a long series asyndeton examples in literature words or lists, asyndeton examples in literature.

Polysyndeton uses conjunctions after every word or term, while asyndeton uses no conjunctions but only commas. It was hard to keep depression at bay. This is among the best examples of asyndeton examples in literature found in classical or religious text.

Maya Angelou, a popular female poet, is well known for her use of polysyndeton, which can seem excessive at times. The continuity in the entire sentence is remarkable, asyndeton examples in literature, and the rhythm is exhilarating.

Little tumuli of oyster shells in the oyster season, and of lobster shells in the lobster season, and of broken crockery and faded cabbage leaves in all seasons, encroached upon its high places. Charles Dickens is also well-known for his use of polysyndeton, as well as commas — often using both of these devices.

You can see the effects in this passage taken from Dombey and Son. Polysyndeton performs several functions. Not only does it join words, phrases, and clauses, bringing continuity to a sentence, but it acts also as a stylistic device that brings rhythm to the text with the repetition of conjunctions in quick succession.

It is also employed as a tool to lay emphasis to the ideas the conjunctions connect. Definition of Polysyndeton Polysyndeton is a stylistic device in which several coordinating conjunctions are used in succession in order to achieve an artistic effect.

 

Polysyndeton and Asyndeton: Definition and Examples - The Write Practice

 

asyndeton examples in literature

 

The Opposite of Polysyndeton: Asyndeton. Polysyndeton has an opposite, called asyndeton (something Joe is very fond of using). Asyndeton is what would result if you replaced all the conjunctions in the sample sentence above with commas, as in the famous Julius Caesar quote, “Veni, vidi, vici.”. Asyndeton, the omission of the conjunctions that ordinarily join coordinate words or clauses, as in the phrase “I came, I saw, I conquered” or in Matthew Arnold’s poem The Scholar Gipsy. Thou hast not lived, why should’st thou perish, so? Thou hadst one aim, one business, one desire; Else wert thou long since numbered with the dead! Asyndeton is a rhetorical term for a writing style that omits conjunctions between words, phrases, or clauses. Here are some examples from other writers.